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Basic neck nitro question

 
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SRVYJM



Joined: 09 Dec 2009
Posts: 3
Location: Denver

PostPosted: Tue Jan 03, 2017 6:40 pm    Post subject: Basic neck nitro question Reply with quote

So I'm spraying my very highly figured flame maple neck with ReRanch Nitro clear coat to make the flame "pop" and it's looking awesome- but should I be sanding between coats? I sanded with wet/dry (black) sand paper between the first two coats- it got really "white" until I wiped it all down before I sprayed the second coat on.

Do I need to sand between coats or just keep spraying on a very thin coat every day for five days or so- then sand or polish the final coat? And that's the big question, do I sand or just polish the final coat with like a burnishing cream or something? I can't find any guidelines in the ReRanch 101 on neck finishing and polishing info.
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Gatorcountry



Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 601
Location: Gainesville, FL

PostPosted: Tue Jan 03, 2017 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not unless you get a run or some foreign object stuck in the finish.
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twangster



Joined: 05 Aug 2005
Posts: 9513
Location: Nashville Tennessee.

PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2017 11:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shooting clear on a neck is the same routine as a body unless you want a very thin skin finish.

When you sand it's going to go white, use naphtha to wipe sanding dust off, and also wipe between coats just to be sure it's free of body oil etc between coats. ( Not passes)

Did you see the RR 101 info on passes, coats , wet sanding and how to go through all the grades to get a final polish ?
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SRVYJM



Joined: 09 Dec 2009
Posts: 3
Location: Denver

PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2017 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

twangster wrote:
Shooting clear on a neck is the same routine as a body unless you want a very thin skin finish.

When you sand it's going to go white, use naphtha to wipe sanding dust off, and also wipe between coats just to be sure it's free of body oil etc between coats. ( Not passes)

Did you see the RR 101 info on passes, coats , wet sanding and how to go through all the grades to get a final polish ?


Do you mean this? "First clean the chipped spot with naphtha, let the naphtha dry and with a tooth pick or very fine brush drop/flow a drop of lacquer into the chipped area. Let the drop dry from three hours to overnight (best) and repeat. The filled area should be slightly higher than the original finish. When dry the filled area can be wet sanded. Using a small flat block (a personal favorite is a small computer battery) wet sand beginning with #400 and working up to at least #800. When sanding continually wipe the repair dry and check the surrounding area for sand through. After the spot has been sanded flat with no shiny spots in or around the drop, rub out the repair with rubbing compound (red), polishing compound (white) and final polish with a swirl remover. Dupont automotive compounds work well and the 3M product " Finesse It II" works very well as the final polish. "

If that's what you're referring to- no- I hadn't seen that but went back and re-read the 101 section- since I wasn't doing a "spot" repair I missed that. So that really helped- I've progressed up to wet sanding with #800- now I need to go get the rubbing compounds to polish her up. Looking forward to getting this axe back in circulation- it's been my main axe for years and I'm missing it!

Thanks for the help!
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