The Guitar Refinishing and Restoration Forum Forum Index The Guitar Refinishing and Restoration Forum
This discussion forum is hosted by The Guitar ReRanch and was created to serve those interested in the arcane art/science of guitar refinishing and restoration. Those with all levels of experience are welcomed to participate.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Pickguard Painting + Stencils

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Guitar Refinishing and Restoration Forum Forum Index -> Guitar Finishing and Restoration
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Jib



Joined: 20 Dec 2016
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 2017 12:14 am    Post subject: Pickguard Painting + Stencils Reply with quote

Old pickguard below. Originally it was white. There is a black base coat and then the green is on top. I need to copy the paint design onto a new pickguard.

How?

NOTE: I can easily cut the new pickguard out of wood, if that would help at all. Wood is an option, in addition to plastic. I have 1/24" cherry veneer right now that I could laminate to make an approximately .084" thick pickguard. As long as cherry would take paint OK (?)

About all the information I can find on stencils is middle aged moms making "Home Is Where The Heart Is" wood ornaments on YouTube. I'm pretty sure this is some level of hell and honestly I probably deserve to be here. But I need your help getting out.

Is there a better way than making a stencil? Or if a stencil would work, what exactly do I need? I've tried Oramask 813 and that failed, as the nitro caused the stencil film to wrinkle, and seemed to melt some of the adhesive off onto my test piece of plywood.

I didn't realize that I needed transfer tape with stencils either, which would explain why peeling it off and trying to apply it was such a nightmare.

So, finishers here, how would you approach a job like this? If anyone could throw me a life raft I'd greatly appreciate it, 'cause I'm drowning over here.



Sketch of re-designed pickguard and paint pattern that I tried and failed to make into a stencil (but haven't given up on):

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Lon



Joined: 30 Dec 2003
Posts: 6085
Location: Stephenville, TX

PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 2017 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Take your drawing to a sign shop and have them cut a vinyl stencil. They will put out your design into computer design program and cut it out on vinyl plotter cutter. Paint the base coat, apply stencil and remove areas to be painted top color, paint and pull stencil, clear coat. Nice crisp lines and easy to use. Ask for instructions if you are unsure of steps
_________________
__________________________________
#313. Praisegig
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jib



Joined: 20 Dec 2016
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey guys.

Decided to go ahead and try cutting a stencil myself. I ordered some mylar stencil film on eBay (from "stencils-by-joanie"). Set it on my cutting mat and cut it out with an Xacto. Went to the arts and crafts store and got some Krylon low tack spray adhesive. Took a deep breath after spraying the adhesive on the stencil, then stuck it on the pickguard.

I mixed up blue, white and yellow pigment for the basecoat on the pickguard. Scuffed it up with some red scotch brite and the lacquer grabbed really well.

For the black, I used black pigment and black Transtint dye. I find that the dye gets a much deeper, more piecing 'true' black than the black pigment alone.





I *did* get some bleeding. I made the mistake of spraying too heavy. I couldn't find my air brush so I used a regular HVLP gun and I think it laid down way too much lacquer.

The lacquer wouldn't dry on the mylar film, and when I peeled the stencil off, it left some 'cobweb' trails of black along each line.

Currently I'm in the process of using my Badger air brush, along with the help of Frog Tape, to touch everything up. I saved a bunch of the blue-green color, and the black, because I anticipated making some mistakes.

Taping carefully along each line, and touching up any mismatches, is tedious work, but it's going along OK.

I did spray some clear over the stencil first, because if anything was going to bleed initially, I wanted it to be clear instead of black.

@ Lon

Do you think there could be any issues with bleeding when spraying a clear coat? I've been seriously considering leaving this one without a clear coat.

I have been using the Jet Spray blush eraser pretty liberally, as it's quite humid out here these days. And I have found that occasionally it'll cause some of the black stripes to bleed onto the green basecoat, which I have to go back and touch up.

Is there anything I can use as a barrier coat between the paint design and a clearcoat?

My worst fear at this point is that if I spray some clearcoats over the paint design, it'll cause the black to bleed and meld with the green. Even if it's only a little bit, I don't want it to ruin it.

It'll probably look OK without a clearcoat, but the clear would allow me to wet sand and buff it out, which would look a lot better...I'm still scared to put a clear coat on, though.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Lon



Joined: 30 Dec 2003
Posts: 6085
Location: Stephenville, TX

PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

When you get all the coloring done, I would suggest misting a couple coats of clear. This will lock in the coloring and not cause bleeding. Then you could start with slightly wetter coats

Using blush eraser will make the coloring run, as it keeps the nitro from curing for a longer period to allow gassing off and letting any moisture to come to the top
_________________
__________________________________
#313. Praisegig
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
BrightKJ



Joined: 13 Sep 2008
Posts: 342
Location: Midlothian, VA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would think it would have been much better to use the template to mark the pickguard and then lay down some tape to use as a mask. You're dealing with all straight lines other than the circle in the center which could easily be taped and then cut. Just my $0.02.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Jib



Joined: 20 Dec 2016
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 11:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

@ BrightKJ

I think you're absolutely right.

Just a mist coat, enough to mark the location of the lines out, then take the stencil off and tape it off and spray the wet coats.

This is basically what I have to do now anyway because of the bleeding. If I'd done it in the beginning I'd probably be OK right now.

It might actually be easier at this point to just sand through the bleed-throughs. I think it'll leave enough black for me to be able to see where I need to lay the tape down. And then just redo it all. It should take a lot less time than what I was doing yesterday, tediously touching up all these areas and creating more problems (lines of lacquer left from using tape, divits from small areas I needed to wetsand, etc.....better off just wiping the whole thing and starting over).

The spiral stencils will indeed be another beast, but for the straight lines, I think what you suggested is absolutely the way to go.

I am going to try using a heat tool to cut the stencil for the spiral parts. Although I have found that mylar *is* sandable. It's tedious but not too much worse than sanding a pickguard template to perfection, which I have plenty of experience with. Time consuming and tedious, but definitely manageable.

I've found that Frog Tape works very well too. Even with very heavy coats of lacquer there's no bleed-thru anywhere.

@ Lon

I will try misting some clear on and then going heavier once it's done. That sounds like the right way to go and I'll feel much better about having a clearcoat on it. I don't think yellowing will be too much of an issue given the blue-green color of the basecoat.

Thanks for the advice!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jib



Joined: 20 Dec 2016
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 2017 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Update!

I ended up cutting a circle out of mylar to use as a stencil. Traced around a can of Behlen's Dewaxer with an Xacto blade.

I put it up to the edge of the lines, and found that some didn't come even close to it. So I used Frog Tape along each line and got each one cleanly up to the edges of the circle. It looks a lot more professional now.

The spirals came out OK too. I just did my best to freehand the stencil with an Xacto, and used one of those electric stencil cutting tools (basically a wood burner with a fine tip) to smooth some of the sharper edges.

But mylar with spray adhesive is working great, and it's reusable, which is convenient.

My gun spat out white pigment everywhere and I had to touch the whole thing up again. Didn't learn my lesson about having a dedicated clearcoat gun, and paid the price for shooting clear with a gun I'd previously shot primer out of.

The stencil came in handy for that. Just lots of color touchup with the airbrush and locking in the touchups with clearcoat.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Guitar Refinishing and Restoration Forum Forum Index -> Guitar Finishing and Restoration All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group