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Anybody heard of Webster Electric of Racine, Wisconsin?

 
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DustyMurphy



Joined: 16 May 2010
Posts: 1396
Location: Lawrence, KS

PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 10:37 pm    Post subject: Anybody heard of Webster Electric of Racine, Wisconsin? Reply with quote

I happened by a garage sale yesterday where a older guy had a box of tubes for sale, he wanted about $5 each for most of them, I explained which ones some of my amps could use, and he only had a few 12AX7's and two matched pairs of 6L6's all USA RCA made, which was pretty awesome. He explained he was a ham radio enthusiast and was using mostly solid state stuff now and didn't need them, I bought a few other things, and I was actually in the car and his wife stopped me, he had something for me. I got out, and he explained that he'd owned a roller rink in San Bernardino in the late 50's and early to mid 60's and he had an old PA amp that I could have. I went with him into the shed and we finally found it, it's a Webster Electronic TP12-1 amp. He thought based on my description of guitar amps tubes that I could use it, and I think I can too. It's got the following tubes:

Quote:

RCA 6CA4
RCA 6AU6
RCA 12AX7
Amperex EF86
And two RCA 6v6 tubes.


It looks REALLY clean, and almost new. It has a XLR microphone input and a phono input with a 1/4 inch guitar type input, and a "line" output with two flat head screws. The controls are Microphone, Phono, Bass, Treble.

Anybody know anything about these are what they're worth? Google didn't bring up anything. Confused The tubes seemed like they'd make a nice guitar amp, am I right in this? Any and all advice would be appreciated.
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twangster



Joined: 05 Aug 2005
Posts: 9513
Location: Nashville Tennessee.

PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 10:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They made tape recorders etc., and associated playback systems.

I have a webster I plan to covert to a guitar amp. Not sure of the value. They often glued a schematic sheet inside on coverplates etc, so be careful if you plan to take it apart !

some info here. http://www.angelfire.com/vt/audio/webster.html
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DustyMurphy



Joined: 16 May 2010
Posts: 1396
Location: Lawrence, KS

PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you, I appreciate it. Mine has a metal cover with several holes in it, almost like a honeycomb. I'll try to get a picture of it on Monday or Tuesday. My phone doesn't take good photos and I don't have a digital camera right now.

What would I have to do to covert it to a guitar amp? Just wire up a 1/4" jack instead of the two-screw "line" output?

I'll try to take a picture of the back panel too. I had high hopes it'd make a fun guitar amp, especially being 12 watts, it'd be perfect for getting crunchier sounds here in the house without annoying everybody. Laughing
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sonicblue



Joined: 15 Mar 2007
Posts: 935
Location: CT

PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A NOS Amperex EF86 can go for around $100. That's a great find! Current production of that tube seems to be plagued by microphonics, making the old ones all the more valuable. RCA's are good too, looks like you struck gold there.
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Structo



Joined: 21 Nov 2004
Posts: 26415
Location: Salem, OR

PostPosted: Sun Jul 11, 2010 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Generally with old PA amps, you have to convert one of the inputs to guitar.
Most likely the Mic will be the one to convert.
That includes of course the 1/4" jack and also a 1 Meg resistor.
Also it is beneficial to add a grid stopper resistor to prevent and radio interference.
This can be anywhere from 22K to 68K without changing the tone at all.
Just look at a guitar amp schematic to see how that is done.

You could try to reform the caps in that amp.
But you will need to do that before ever powering it up.
If you have turned it on then it's too late to do it.

If you feel comfortable around high voltages then PM me I and I will tell you how to reform the caps.
That may or may not do any good depending on the condition of them.
If the amp has been stored in a hot place then most likely they will need to be replaced.
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Tom



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DustyMurphy



Joined: 16 May 2010
Posts: 1396
Location: Lawrence, KS

PostPosted: Sun Jul 11, 2010 10:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This one isn't mine, it's just a picture I found on Photobucket, but it's exactly the same as mine visually:



I'm not sure about the heat, who knows where it was from the time he packed it in until recently, but he had a little shed/guest house thing that had a window mounted AC he used as his "Radio Shack" and it was in there. He said he used it to play record and make announcements about "the skates." It looks clean and is extremely dust free for being that old, but still needs a little bit of a cleaning. I haven't powered it up since I bought it, and I doubt he has either. the cable is grounded but a little frayed so I figured on replacing that before I plugged it in, just in case.
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Structo



Joined: 21 Nov 2004
Posts: 26415
Location: Salem, OR

PostPosted: Sun Jul 11, 2010 11:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, be sure to properly install a three prong cord with ground.

On second thought, installing a Hi / Lo input might be cool.

That way it would most likely play nice with single coils as well as humbuckers if you play both.

This layout shows how to wire the Hi Lo thing.
The jack with the 1 Meg resistor is the Hi gain input and the other the Lo.

It is better to locate the grid stoppers (the 68K resistors) right on the socket pins for best noise rejection.
Use shielded cable and only ground the shield at the jack end.
If you have any old stereo cable like used in head phones you can scavenge some of that for a two conductor shielded cable to use.

You can attach a terminal strip near the socket and run the 68K resistors from the socket pins to the terminals, then the shielded cable to the terminal for a rock solid installation.

If you don't want the Hi / Lo feature, just skip that and install the jack with a 1 Meg resistor across the two contacts and then install the 68K grid stopper right on the input pin of the tube.

If the amp already has a grid resistor or resistor on the input you will probably want to remove that.
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Tom



ReRanch 101 Finishing Tutorial
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