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Shoreline project - 320 or 400 grit question.

 
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Should I use primer under shoreline gold metallic on a '58 Jazzmaster?
yes, primer is a must
100%
 100%  [ 17 ]
no, just go straight to shoreline
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Total Votes : 17

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by the sea



Joined: 29 May 2007
Posts: 140
Location: FL

PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2008 6:54 pm    Post subject: Shoreline project - 320 or 400 grit question. Reply with quote

hi,
(I decided to go with primer. Thanks!)

The s&s has been sanded to 320. next primer, then color. Sand to 400 before primer? 400 after primer?

.

Thanks! I'll post some pics once the project progresses.


Last edited by by the sea on Sun Jun 15, 2008 10:09 am; edited 1 time in total
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Taiwan Luthier



Joined: 16 Dec 2003
Posts: 2496
Location: Taiwan again, damm!

PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2008 6:56 pm    Post subject: Re: Is primer necessary under shoreline gold? Reply with quote

You should always primer any solid colors unless it's black (it covers really well) but even then primer it to make sure the wood grain doesn't bleed through.
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SonicJaguar



Joined: 02 Feb 2008
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Location: Staten Island, NY

PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2008 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's not really true. You can get away without priming, Fender did it all of the time. As a matter of fact I would definately prime a body with black since it shows everything. Anyhoo, Gold needs a primer. It's a very weak cover.
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dkbushee



Joined: 11 Jun 2008
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2008 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you think Olympic White would need a primer?
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dkbushee



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PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2008 7:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if the white does need one, what kind?
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SonicJaguar



Joined: 02 Feb 2008
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2008 7:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dkbushee wrote:
Do you think Olympic White would need a primer?


If you have the opportunity to do it then by all means. Why not.
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Kregg



Joined: 22 Apr 2008
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2008 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As an artist/artisan, having tried my hand at gilding, I can tell you that nothing makes gold standout better than a red base coat. However, the description for Shoreline Gold states that it looks better with white primer ... so I'd go with that.

Last edited by Kregg on Sat Jun 14, 2008 8:28 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Kregg



Joined: 22 Apr 2008
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2008 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dkbushee wrote:
Do you think Olympic White would need a primer?


The biggest reason for primer on wood has more to do with cost. If you don't prime you might need more paint. Since we use shellac based sander sealer's the need for primer is less. Primer may also insure that dark graining does not come through the finish, especially when shooting white. I am finishing up an Oly Strat; which I shot with primer first.
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by the sea



Joined: 29 May 2007
Posts: 140
Location: FL

PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great! I'll try to use 1/2 can or less of primer.

The s&s has been sanded to 320. Should I sand to 400 before shooting primer, or will the 320 be good? I have 320 scratches on there now.

Should I sand the primer coat with 400 or higher?

thank you
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Structo



Joined: 21 Nov 2004
Posts: 26415
Location: Salem, OR

PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kregg wrote:
dkbushee wrote:
Do you think Olympic White would need a primer?


The biggest reason for primer on wood has more to do with cost. If you don't prime you might need more paint. Since we use shellac based sander sealer's the need for primer is less. Primer may also insure that dark graining does not come through the finish, especially when shooting white. I am finishing up an Oly Strat; which I shot with primer first.

I the sanding sealer I use is nitro based.
Deft as well as Bill's is nitro based. Wink

Kregg wrote:
dkbushee wrote:
Do you think Olympic White would need a primer?


The biggest reason for primer on wood has more to do with cost. If you don't prime you might need more paint. Since we use shellac based sander sealer's the need for primer is less. Primer may also insure that dark graining does not come through the finish, especially when shooting white. I am finishing up an Oly Strat; which I shot with primer first.

The sanding sealer I use is nitro based.
Deft as well as Bill's is nitro based. Wink

To answer to the first question, my practice is to sand the primer coat nice and smooth.

I even go up to 400-600 to get it baby butt smooth.
The reason for this is that I have had sanding scratches in the primer to come back and haunt me when I was spraying the color coats.
I spray a nice coat ( three passes ) of primer, let dry, block sand with 400 dry, wipe with naphtha, spray another three passes, let dry sand with 600 dry.

Bill's primer is the best, and is very heavy bodied so you have to watch the sanding as you can change radiuses and profiles if not careful.
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Jai



Joined: 15 Jun 2006
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Location: Mount Vernon, WA

PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm with Structo, I'd sand to 600 after that primer as well.
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Kregg



Joined: 22 Apr 2008
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Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 12:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Guys, while we're on the subject of Olympic White. I am not going to use a topcoat over the color (I don't want a yellow guitar later). How many coats of Oly should I use before I buff out the sheen?
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Kregg



Joined: 22 Apr 2008
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Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jai wrote:
I'm with Structo, I'd sand to 600 after that primer as well.


And here I thought I was being radical!
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Structo



Joined: 21 Nov 2004
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Location: Salem, OR

PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kregg, I would put the whole can on it.
Try to plan it so your final wet coats are nice and smooth with little orange peel.
Heat the can by putting it in the kitchen sink drain and fill the sink to the top of the can with hot water.
This builds pressure in the can and helps it spray better.
Don't try to spray the last bit out of the can as it will start spitting.

Just follow the rules of threes.
Three or four passes per coat three times a day.
By putting the whole can on, you will have less of a chance of sand throughs.
When sanding start up in grits like 1000 if you can get away with it.
Hopefully everything was block sanded nice and flat including sanding sealer and primer so you won't have any high spots that will sand through when wet sanding and polishing. Wink
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Kregg



Joined: 22 Apr 2008
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Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Tom, that's pretty much what I was doing. So far the coats have gone on like a dream. I've used about 1.25 cans. I'll shoot the last coat with your suggestion.

Thanks again,
Craig
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